Due to Storm: Hip Me w. Your Best Shot Workshop now 2/6

150409_kim_gibilisco_rutgers_whitneybrowne-168Hip Me With Your Best Shot          

with Kim Gibilisco MFA, MA, PMA-CPT  Saturday 2/6/2016 4-7 PM $150

Hip Me…  is designed to enhance the participants’ understanding of the various challenges encountered and viable solution options when working with clients with labral pathologies. To date, there are no bonafide guidelines for the pre and post-rehabilitation of hip scopes for labral pathologies. 

However, both Physical Therapists and Pilates teachers frequently encounter pre and post hip scope patients/clients. Successful outcomes incorporate identifying adequate ranges of motion with optimal joint congruency, alignment and efficient neuromuscular recruitment strategies in a pain-free environment. 

Utilizing Pilates mat and equipment, participants of this workshop will understand the rationale behind re-education strategies using the Pilates repertoire and apparatus.  The goal of the workshop is to offer new movement strategies and viable solutions for care and conditioning to an ever growing population.

Master equipment class: Anatomy Dances to the Core

The New Year brings an exciting Master Pilates Equipment class for Pilates teachers, intermediate/advanced movers and lovers of Pilates.  This class will explore new research about the body and applications to a Pilates Class.

With the exciting information coming from Biotensegrity, fascia and other movement modalities,  we have come to understand the core is more than abdominals.  Stability is a dynamic dance around the joints that is constantly changing.

Core is more than abdominals: It is three dimensional.
How you use your limbs can affect the quality and coordination of the core.  It is more than muscle; how does your fascia affect your body.

Single $36 Saturdays 3-4PM 
Intermediate/Advanced

    • 2/6/16 with Kim Gibilisco
    • 3/5/16 with Doris Pasteleur Hall
    • 4/30/16 with Lesley A. Powell
    • 5/21/16 with Doris Pasteleur Hall
    • 6/11/16 with Lesley A. Powell

This Weekend: Hip Me With Your Best Shot

Anatomy Dances by Lesley A. Powell

Anatomy Dances by Lesley A. Powell

Hip Me With Your Best Shot          

with Kim Gibilisco MFA, MA, PMA-CPT  Saturday 1/23/2016 4-7 PM $150

Hip Me…  is designed to enhance the participants’ understanding of the various challenges encountered and viable solution options when working with clients with labral pathologies. To date, there are no bonafide guidelines for the pre and post-rehabilitation of hip scopes for labral pathologies. 

However, both Physical Therapists and Pilates teachers frequently encounter pre and post hip scope patients/clients. Successful outcomes incorporate identifying adequate ranges of motion with optimal joint congruency, alignment and efficient neuromuscular recruitment strategies in a pain-free environment. 

Utilizing Pilates mat and equipment, participants of this workshop will understand the rationale behind re-education strategies using the Pilates repertoire and apparatus.  The goal of the workshop is to offer new movement strategies and viable solutions for care and conditioning to an ever growing population.

Start your new year embodiment- Upcoming workshops in NYC

Master equipment class: Anatomy Dances to the Core

The New Year brings an exciting Master Pilates Equipment class for Pilates teachers, intermediate/advanced movers and lovers of Pilates.  This class will explore new research about the body and applications to a Pilates Class.

With the exciting information coming from Biotensegrity, fascia and other movement modalities,  we have come to understand the core is more than abdominals.  Stability is a dynamic dance around the joints that is constantly changing.

Core is more than abdominals: It is three dimensional.
How you use your limbs can affect the quality and coordination of the core.  It is more than muscle; how does your fascia affect your body.

Single $36 Saturdays 3-4PM 
Intermediate/Advanced

    • 1/23/16 with Kim Gibilisco
    • 3/5/16 with Doris Pasteleur Hall
    • 4/30/16 with Lesley A. Powell
    • 5/21/16 with Doris Pasteleur Hall
    • 6/11/16 with Lesley A. Powell

Hip Me With Your Best Shot          

with Kim Gibilisco MFA, MA, PMA-CPT  Saturday 1/23/2016 4-7 PM $150

Hip Me…  is designed to enhance the participants’ understanding of the various challenges encountered and viable solution options when working with clients with labral pathologies. To date, there are no bonafide guidelines for the pre and post-rehabilitation of hip scopes for labral pathologies. 

However, both Physical Therapists and Pilates teachers frequently encounter pre and post hip scope patients/clients. Successful outcomes incorporate identifying adequate ranges of motion with optimal joint congruency, alignment and efficient neuromuscular recruitment strategies in a pain-free environment. 

Utilizing Pilates mat and equipment, participants of this workshop will understand the rationale behind re-education strategies using the Pilates repertoire and apparatus.  The goal of the workshop is to offer new movement strategies and viable solutions for care and conditioning to an ever growing population.

Biotensegrity

Science is having us look at the body differently.  Graham Scharr and Rudolph Laban both are fascinated by the numerous examples of geometric patterns and shapes in nature and its relationship to the body. New research into fascia is changing how we understand the foundations of support within our bodies.
with Doris Pasteleur Hall and Lesley A. Powell 
Saturdays 4-7 PM $150 Early Bird discount pay by prior 20 days to workshop date 15% off
Objective:

  • An introduction to new models of anatomy
  • How principles of Biotensegrity, Space harmony and new research about fascia are models of dynamic movement   
  • Applications will be made to Pilates, yoga and other movement modalities. 
  1. Biotensegrity and the Inner Core
    March 5, 2016 with Doris Pasteleur Hall
  2. Biotensegrity and the Outer Core
    April 30, 2016 with Lesley A. Powell
  3. Biotensegrity and the Arms Dancing with the Core
    May 21, 2016 with Doris Pasteleur Hall
  4. Biotensegrity and the Legs Dancing with the Core
    June 11, 2016 with Lesley A. Powell

Shoulders and a Kissable Available Neck

Top of the ShoulderFrom one of my students.

I have been teaching a friend and she has the tendency to shrug her shoulder/use her upper traps any chance she gets. The constant reminder to keep collar bones wide, not shrugging the shoulders/keeping my hands on the area do not seem enough. What would your advice be to handle a customer like this? Are there any props which can help?

Appreciate any help, thanks!!

Essential for a healthy shoulders is the timing and the control of the motion of the scapula, clavicle and humerus bone.  Irmagard Bartenieff refer to this as the hand-scapula relationship.  See below some online videos.

Teaching your client the movements of the scapula is very important.  Finding the quietness of the scapula shaping around the ribs is essential.  When a client is using their upper traps too much, they are losing important use of their arms.  For some, the movement will feel less because you are not letting the scapula slide up to the ears.

Click on links for more information about the scapula.

Youtube:Scapular Revolution w. Lesley Powellantser extension

scapu

Fusion Fitness Online/ Scapular Revolution w. Lesley Powell
Scapular Upward rotation

 

Master Pilates Equipment Class: Anatomy Dances to the Core

Anatomy DancesThe New Year brings an exciting Master Pilates Equipment class for Pilates teachers, intermediate/advanced movers and lovers of Pilates.  This class will explore new research about the body and applications to a Pilates Class.

With the exciting information coming from Biotensegrity, fascia and other movement modalities,  we have come to understand the core is more than abdominals.  Stability is a dynamic dance around the joints that is constantly changing.

Core is more than abdominals:

  • It is three dimensional.
  • How you use your limbs can affect the quality and coordination of the core.
  • It is more than muscle; how does your fascia affect your body.

Master equipment class: ANATOMY DANCES TO THE CORE

Single $36 Saturdays 3-4PM 
Intermediate/Advanced

    • 1/23/16 with Kim Gibilisco
    • 2/27/16 with Lesley Powell
    • 3/19/16 with Doris Pasteleur Hall
    • 4/30/16 with Lesley A. Powell
    • 5/21/16 with Doris Pasteleur Hall
    • 6/11/16 with Lesley A. Powell

Hip Me With Your Best Shot w. Kim Gibilisco NYC

150409_kim_gibilisco_rutgers_whitneybrowne-168

I am so excited to have Kim Gibilisco come to Chelsea Movements Pilates and Gyrotonic Studio to teach on the hips.  there are so many changes happening in hip injuries and replacements.  Kim brings in the latest information about the hip and post rehabilitation techniques.

Master Equipment Class  January 23, 2016 3-4 PM  $36 Single class

Hip Me With Your Best Shot

with Kim Gibilisco MFA, MA, PMA-CPT January 23, 2016 4-7  PM $150

Hip Me… is designed to enhance the participants’ understanding of the various challenges encountered and viable solution options when working with clients with labral pathologies. To date, there are no bonafide guidelines for the pre and post-rehabilitatiron of hip scopes for labral pathologies. However, both Physical Therapists and Pilates teachers frequently encounter pre and post hip scope patients/clients. Successful outcomes incorporate identifying adequate ranges of motion with optimal joint congruency, alignment and efficient neuromuscular recruitment strategies in a pain-free environment. Utilizing Pilates mat and equipment, participants of this workshop will understand the rationale behind re-education strategies using the Pilates repertoire and apparatus.

The goal of the workshop is to offer new movement strategies and viable solutions for care and conditioning to an ever growing population.

To register: chelseamovementsdesk@gmail.com 231 W. 18th St.

To register: chelseamovementsdesk@gmail.com
231 W. 18th St. 212-414-1103

 

 

 

 

Gibiliscoheadshot215Kim Gibilisco, MFA, MA, PMA®-CPT, served as the Vice-Chair/Secretary of the PMA Certification Commission from 2008-2013. She has also served the PMA on the Item Review and Item Writing Committees. Kim is the Director of Pilates Training and Lecturer of Dance at Mason Gross School of the Arts – Rutgers University, where she instructs courses in the BFA curriculum, teaches Pilates apparatus and mat and delivers the Polestar Comprehensive Pilates Teacher Training Series. August 2013 marked the first offering of Polestar Pilates Teacher Training in a University setting. Kim adapted the Polestar curriculum for Rutgers University standards and serves as the lead educator.  She also enjoys her robust private Pilates practice, Intuit Movement Lab, located in New York City. She specializes in working with professional athletes and performers, as well as pre and post surgical cases with her husband, Robert Turner, PT, OCS, PMA®-CPT. http://www.intuitmoves.com

 

Career Evolution and Transitions By Lesley A. Powell, PMA®-CPT. (Special thanks to Marcia Polas in helping me write this!)

Lesley PowellCareer Evolution and Transitions

By Lesley A. Powell, PMA®-CPT

If I were to write one long headline to describe where I am in my life and career right now, it would have to be, “Lesley A. Powell brings together her unique career as a dancer, choreographer, world acclaimed Pilates instructor, movement educator, and artist.”

My life has always been about the body. It first started with dancing. I always wanted to dance. In first or second grade, my mom agreed to dance class—as long as I made the phone call to the dance teacher, but I was too shy to do it.

Once I was in junior high school I met some people who were taking dance classes. My first dance teacher just did improvisation work. She taught a tiny bit of technique and then all creative work.

I studied at Temple University while still a high school student. But eager to leave home and have the real college experience, I chose the University of Wisconsin. The dance department wasn’t great, but in Madison I found a school to learn mime. Dr. Reid Gilbert changed my life!

At the mime school you had to create your own work. He had this wonderful way of giving you support to create while he pushed you to do better. At a final concert there that year, I realized I wanted to be a choreographer, and to continue with dance. Thus, I returned to Temple and their dance department.

I was definitely more interested in being a choreographer than a dancer. I started dancing with grad students who introduced me to Laban. His work about space harmony was how I thought about choreography. At the American Dance Festival I took an Effort Shape class (Laban) and that class changed how I performed my solo there. It was one of those magical moments in my life.

NYC or Bust

Post graduation I moved to New York City where I was dancing and choreographing, and cleaning apartments and bartending to keep things going. I also was hired, and then fired from a physical fitness job. I was fired from it for not teaching a “hard enough” class. At that moment I decided I would never teach again unless I loved what I taught.

I then went to the Laban Institute of Movement Studies to study Space Harmony. It definitely enriched my choreography. One of my colleagues there, Eveline Erni (a physical therapist in NYC), worked for an osteopath who specialized in sports and dance patients. She got me a job within Dr. Bacharach’s Osteopathic Center for Sports and Dance Medicine’s fitness program for injured clients. This is where I learned about function and dysfunction. Watching their dysfunction in doing fundamental movement taught me about me. This led me back to the fitness world with a specialty!

Roberta Wein, one of the physical therapists I worked for at Dr. Bacharach’s, left to be a physical therapist at Romana Kryzanowska’s Pilates studio. JRW Physical Therapy was born from that, and they brought many of Romana’s teachers with them after the studio closed.

Meanwhile, I was getting frustrated with the fitness environment. I was looking into Pilates and Gyrotonic when Roberta called. She was having an issue with the Pilates teachers teaching the injured population. They paid me to learn to teach Pilates.

My teacher was Cary Reagan. She was always really supportive of all parts of my work – including allowing the Laban work into my teaching practice. Through a client, a dancer and Laban colleague, I was tapped for a job teaching dance and choreography at Drew University. I was adjunct faculty there from 1991-2001, teaching classes in modern dance, dance history, and choreography.

At the same time, I started teaching at Leslie Kaminoff’s studio. I was teaching a movement class and developed quite a following there — including an attorney who pushed me to open my own place. I naively thought that by opening a studio and consolidating all my clients I would have more time to work on choreography.

The Movements Afoot Years

I was teaching Physioball® classes at the studio and started sending press releases out to promote them. I received international recognition for this teaching.  Eventually, Shape magazine did a five-page article on me! It was wonderful.

If you don’t own the building your space is in, you are at the mercy of your landlords, so when one studio space sold out from under us, we moved to 30th Street. At that same time, Joan Breibart invited me to be on the faculty of the PhysicalMind teacher training program. Joan was how I got involved in gait. I was fortunate to work with Marika Molnar to help create a “Pilates Stand” course and book.  My studies with Marika Molnar, Irene Dowd, Jean Claude West and Shelley Studdenberg sparked my interest in gait.

Due to some health problems, I gave up my position at Drew to run the studio full time. That was the end of my career as a choreographer.

I had started teaching teachers in ‘87/88 and have always worked on teaching teachers about the body. When we were asked to develop a program for the Japanese I started working on a manual and that lead me back to studying drawing — a passion in high school.

I started with Nicki Orbach, Anatomy for Artists, at the Arts Students league.  Nicki opened Self Portrait of Lesley A. Powellme back to my creative side. I wanted to work with color – and water color seemed like the best option (oils in my apartment!?). I studied at the 92nd Street Y and then at the National Academy of Art in NYC with Kamilla Talbot. As I allowed myself to be freer with my art, I returned to my creative process.

While painting and running the studio, I also worked with FusionFitness online in creating teacher videos about the body and Pilates. I wanted to teach anatomy for them, but getting permission for the pictures was all but impossible. That’s how I decided to start to paint anatomy. But unlike the anatomy books, I wanted to show the motion. Anatomy Dances (the anatomy video series I’m developing for FusionFitness) came from all of that.

I always kept hoping I could get the studio strong enough to hire a full-time manager and focus more on teacher education. It wasn’t happening and I couldn’t figure out what was going wrong. I knew money was coming in but I was having a hard time paying bills and meeting payroll. In 2012, after years of great luck with my office staff, I had the unfortunate experience of an incident of serious employee fraud. This robbed me of my ability to trust on some basic business issues and forced me to take over even more of the business-end tasks.

The Decision to Sell

My brother was diagnosed with stage four colon cancer. His being sick has changed my life. I put the studio on the market and before it sold, he died. I was able to be there for him, but not in the way I had hoped. And it made me realize how much I needed a change. After 21 years in business, I closed Movements Afoot in 2014.

In some ways this past year has been the best of my life. Now that I don’t have the studio, I’m back studying with Irene Dowd. I’m teaching with and collaborating with amazing people from all walks of my life. I’ve studied with Marie-José Blom, made a trip to meet Phillip Beach, and I’ve been pushed further in my research.

My goals this next year are exciting! I started a draft on Laban’s Space Harmony and Bartenieff Fundamentals a decade ago. This year I want to research Irmagard Bartenieff materials to complete my writing. Laban’s work was truly revolutionary for its time and is in sync with the new information coming out on Biotensegrity. I’ve also started oil painting and I’m starting to sell my work!

The Challenge of this Transition

What is the hardest part of transitioning? I’ve always been a mover. There is a certain tightness I feel that I didn’t feel 10 years ago, and I’m moving every day. If I’m going through this, what about clients who aren’t moving every day?

In this CrossFit culture of killing your body you might have the illusion of youth, but we must keep things moving and flowing and our joints healthy. Looking at the fascial work, everything is moving and flowing. Making something rigid and hard could have a consequence someplace else.

Thanks also to the PMA in publishing this in their current newsletter.